Friday, August 27, 2010

10th Post - New York Mosque Balogna

Hi there. Now, as most of you have gathered by now, I don't like religion. But out of all the major religions, I have to say I favor Islam more than Christianity. This has happened for several reasons. For one, there seem to be much fewer "half-Muslims" then there are "half-Christians." Islam is much more strict, in sense than Christianity, but yet you still see people following many of these rules. Many women still wear a burqa or hijab, or niqab. Many Muslims still follow the rules of no alcohol, and no pork. How many self-proclaimed Christians do we see who don't judge, love their neighbor, and don't cheat on their wife?

I promise I am not trying to categorize people into boxes. But perhaps I am so sick of Christianity because of its two-faced-ness. Yes, Islam has its radicals, but so does Christianity. The Oklahoma City Bombing was carried out by a radical Christian, and how many of these massive cults that make the news come from radical sects of Christianity?

My base point is, no matter how much some of these religious behaviors bother me, in this country you have the right, until a certain point, to practice what you believe. Part or practicing your religion is building houses of worship (for most religions) and going there to practice your faith with other members of that community. The fact that so many people are trying to deny the construction of a mosque near ground zero is not only rude, but unconstitutional. I do see how some people consider it rude, and impolite to build a mosque there, but there is already a mosque there, and they simply want to build a new one in the community they already belong in.

Plus, has anyone looked at the Ground Zero site lately? It's trashed. It's gross. If this is supposed to be a memorial, a place for people to come to remember, mounds of dirt and scaffolding is not going to do the job. It truly worries me that our politicians and citizens are too busy being worried about a religious group trying to practice hope and love and peace (which IS what Islam teaches), than to memorialize a site they consider oh so sacred.

If it wasn't an election year, I truly wonder how different the response, from both sides of the aisle, would have been. We can only wonder, and hope that the Constitution is upheld.

11 comments:

  1. Plus, has anyone looked at the Ground Zero site lately? It's trashed. It's gross. If this is supposed to be a memorial, a place for people to come to remember, mounds of dirt and scaffolding is not going to do the job. It truly worries me that our politicians and citizens are too busy being worried about a religious group trying to practice hope and love and peace (which IS what Islam teaches), than to memorialize a site they consider oh so sacred.

    That is the best comment on this topic I've heard yet.

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  2. Thank you! That means a lot, and it is pathetic it is such a true statement. It's been almost 9 years, and it looked the same 7 years ago. They have had plans for years to build a memorial site/building, and they haven't. Congress also refused a heath care plan to take care of the first responders to 9/11. Why are we doing everything we can to NOT truly memorialize something that should mean so much?

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  3. EmmaJoannne, the plans for the proposed Islamic Center include a 9/11 memorial and one of the principal financiers lost two sons in the World Trade Center. It would be ironic if their memorial was completed before the one planned by the City of New York.

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  4. Hm, that I was not aware of! And yes, it would be ironic indeed. We have to remember what a huge tragedy this was for Muslims in America, as well as throughout the world, to see their religion changed into such a hated organization. They seem to me to be doing their part in healing the wound that 9/11 left.

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  5. Here is a story by a reporter for the Jerusalem Post which mentions the September 11 memorial: http://www.jpost.com/International/Article.aspx?id=182332

    I was mistaken in my reference to the investor. Hisham Elzanaty parents died on EgyptAir 990 that crashed in 1999 on a flight from Los Angeles to Cairo. 60 Muslims were killed in the World Trade Center on 9/11: http://www.newshoggers.com/blog/2010/07/mosque-in-manhatten-four-blocks-from-ground-zero.html

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  6. Great points. People need to stop having a knee jerk reaction based on the fact that they categorized their attackers into this vision of a single unified group, as if Islam planned the attack. Certain radical individuals, no more represtative of the faith than Fred Phelps and the Westboro Baptist Church are of Christianity, should not be considered the baseline of the followers of an ideology.

    All the terrorists had two arms, but we don't try to stop people from selling shirts with two arm holes near the site.

    Perspective and common sense seem so sorely lacking on this issue.

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  7. a religious group trying to practice hope and love and peace (which IS what Islam teaches)

    Islam teaches hate and revenge it is a Fascist teaching....see the books of Salman Rushdie.

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  8. I obviously do not know who you are, and while comments are welcome, I suggest you take your discrimination elsewhere. While I could easily tear apart your comment with facts that are not based in bigotry or indolence, I will not, for starting a debate is pointless. Once again, if you do not like what I say, do not read it and continue on elsewhere.

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  9. I agree with you on this. As a "self-proclaimed Christian" I am sickened that our society finds it deplorable to burn crosses on someone's lawn, and yet doesn't take a stand against a demonstrative Koran burning in the parking lot of a Christian church. There are way too many similarities between our faiths and too few differences to make such a fuss about this.

    I agree that they have a right and should be welcome to build a place of worship wherever zoning laws allow. Do I think it wise? Probably not. I believe the mosque will become a target for ignoramuses who have nothing better to do than attack those who are different. If I were them I would not want to deal with the sheer amount of animosity that will be flowing their way.

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  10. I simply could NOT agree with you more. And the unfortunate part is, yes, they will most likely face more hostility than they themselves would ever create. We can only hope it goes smoothly.

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  11. Here is a wonderful article on Tikkun Daily of students and faculty from the Hebrew Union College marching in support of Park51:
    http://www.tikkun.org/tikkundaily/2010/09/02/heeding-heschels-call-...

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